DarielB – Flying Under the Radar

Stocking Stuffers: Music Picks to Keep You Groovin’ Through 2012

Posted in CD Picks by darielb on December 12, 2011

This is the time of year when I sit back with a nog while all y’all tell me what’s cool, hip and happenin’ in the world of music. This year I’ve asked a mix of special friends to share their music picks with us. Enjoy!
Mike Farris
mikefarrismusic.com
Mike Farris. Intense, talented and on fire, this Nashville boy is one of the most exciting performers I’ve ever seen. Check out his picks.
Various Artists
Cosimo Matassa Story (import)
Proper Box (2007)
If you really want to take a peek inside the birthing room of rock & roll, look behind this curtain! Between the 40s and 60s everything that came out of New Orleans was recorded at Cosimo’s J&M Studio. Way too often overlooked, New Orleans and her amazing musicians laid the foundation for rock & roll. If you don’t like this box set, we can never be friends.

Various Artists
Goodbye Babylon (Box Set)
Dust-to-Digital (2003)
Sacred music grown in the hot southern dust. One of the greatest box sets ever put together. Makes me proud to be a southern boy.
From Amazon: Goodbye Babylon is a 6 CD gospel reissue collection. 5 CDs contain 135 songs from 1902-1960 and the 6th disc is comprised of 25 sermons recorded between 1926-1941. Also included is a 200 page book complete with Bible verses, lyric transcriptions, and notes for each recording, plus over 200 illustrations … Sound restoration and mastering by Airshow Mastering, the team that restored the “Anthology of American Folk Music” (Smithsonian Folkways, 1997), and won a Grammy® for their work on “Screamin’ and Hollerin’ the Blues: The Worlds of Charley Patton” (Revenant, 2002). – Reverently packed in raw cotton and housed in a deluxe 8″ x 11″ x 2.5″ cedar box. Notes and essays by musicologists and scholars, including several Grammy® winners. – Contributors include Lynn Abbott, David Evans, Ray Funk, Anthony Heilbut, Kip Lornell, Luigi Monge, Paul Oliver, Opal Louis Nations, Bruce Nemerov, Guido van Rijn, Ken Romanowski, Tony Russell, Doug Seroff, Dick Spottswood, Warren Steel, David Tibet, Gayle Dean Wardlow, and Charles Wolfe.

Bill Withers
Still Bill (DVD)
New Video Group (2011)
Still Bill (documentary)- I know this is not technically a record. It’s a film….and I haven’t even seen this yet, but I can still safely say that it’s a must watch. Bill Withers is one of the great songwriters of our time and a true artist intent on steering his own wheel. Ride on, Bill……ride on.

Brian Rutenberg
brianrutenbergart.com
Brian Rutenberg. Before he grew into his true self as a sought after N.Y.C. artist, this Myrtle Beach boy was a drummer. I knew his picks would be cool, but I had no idea how cool.

Youssou N’Dour
The Lion
Virgin Records (1989)
My first recommendation is the fabulous Senegalese singer/ percussionist Youssou N’Dour whom I saw in concert at S.O.B’s in N.Y.C. in the late 80s. His soulful rhythm, smooth ambient keyboards (somewhat akin to Brian Eno), and musical voice are fabulous. I enjoy many of his albums but my favorite is 1989’s The Lion (Virgin), songs like “Bes” and “My Daughter (Sama Doom)” make me smile. His music also takes me back to the blissful days when I met my wife Katie. Now we have children and they like the same songs.
Robert Shaw & the Robert Shaw Festival Singers
Rachmaninoff Vespers
Teldec (1990)
If you want to be transported through music then Rachmaninoff’s Vespers are a must. They are sublime. Go somewhere you can be totally alone for an hour, shut the lights off, and listen. I also enjoy just looking out a window (preferably on a gloomy day) or a long drive with this recording. My ongoing studies of the late Canadian pianist/philosopher Glenn Gould involve long stretches of driving in Ontario and the Vespers are a perfect soundtrack. Another listening place might be the parking area that juts out onto the beach by the Cherry Grove Inn around 54th/55th Ave N. in North Myrtle Beach. I am not sure if it is still there but watching the surf to these Vespers would be nice; “Bless The Lord,” “O My Soul” and “O Serene Light” reaffirm what it means to be a human being.
Robert Plant
Principle of Moments
Rhino (1983)
Finally I am listening a lot to Robert Plant’s second solo album Principle of Moments released the year I graduated from high school in Myrtle Beach,. Although the drums are not Bonham they are played by Phil Collins with some heavy down beat and the unadorned clarity that Bonham mastered. There was a remaster released in 2007 which I play in my studio a lot. “In the Mood” and “Big Log” are still fabulous songs.
Clair DeLune
bluesmoonradio.blogspot.com
Clair DeLune. Music historian, writer and professor, producer and host of Blues Moon Radio … I love all that Clair does, and I’m grateful for her participation.
Various Artists
Bummed Out Christmas
Rhino (1989)
The Bummed Out Christmas CD seems an odd choice because it is topically dreary, not cheery. As the host of Blues Moon Radio, I talk with a number of people each year who are not upbeat about the holidays. Contrary to popular belief, blues music does not depress one, it is one’s “ticket” for climbing out of a pit of despair and can improve your mood, so I recommend Bummed Out Christmas to all.
This CD fits the bill two ways: For most, it is an over-the-top array of songs so wildly absurd they are laugh out loud funny, thus a welcome break from standard treacly holiday pap . For those in a deep funk, it has been known to provide a balanced perspective – even if only from a “misery loves company” or “someone has it worse” perspective. The most requested holiday song on my radio show each year is “Christmas In Jail,” by the Youngsters, which begins with the ominous “I was in the wrong lane, feeling no pain.” It acts as an ersatz public service announcement – reminding us of our duty to not drive if drinking, but entertains as it informs.
Demetria Taylor
Bad Girl
Delmark (2011)
Bluesman Eddie Taylor’s much-covered classic, “Bad Boy,” is given a twist by his daughter, Demetria. Eddie Taylor, who was not as well-known – yet was integral to the Chicago scene as Jimmy Reed’s guitarist – introduced Reed to that now-famous shuffling style. Eddie Taylor has influenced more people than know his name, including his own children, three of whom work actively in Blues music. This year Taylor’s daughter, Demetria, rises above the “Blues Legacy” tag with her vocals on “Bad Girl,” earning her place in the blues world as a powerhouse of song. It is nominated for Best CD of 2011 Lunie Award on Blues Moon Radio.
Laurence “Luckyman” Beall
The Huntsville Sessions
Turbine Incredible (2010)
Last but not least… indeed this is most likely my absolute favorite find of the year…
Laurence Luckyman Beall is the freshest, most invigorating artist to appear on Blues Moon Radio this year. His work is highly energized and he puts more sound out solo than most artists with backing bands. Sporting the Western-style dress and duck-tail hairstyle that emerged when Rock’n’Roll was young, Beall (pronounced ‘Bell’) is serious about his folio of Blues, Rockabilly and Americana that would get any mule kicking in its stall. Those who see Beall perform are impressed and charmed by his vibrant personality as well as his intense musicianship, comprised of powerful lyrics and melody, and a unique approach to electric chicken-pickin’ guitar work. His CD is the most commented on by Blues Moon Radio’s listeners this year… and many have become enthusiastic converts to “the Luckified.”
Sam Hannaford
SouthBySoutheast.org
Co-founder and past president of the nonprofit South By Southeast music organization, this guy is responsible for making top drawer music (and musicians) accessible to the Carolina coast. Love you, Sam.
Otis Redding
The Definitive Collection (4CD set)
Rhino Records (1993)
After having half finished reading “Bill Graham Presents,” the autobiography/biography of Bill Graham, I realized that he and I have two things in common. One, we have helped put on music concerts (not that I put myself 1000th in the same company of this great Rock Icon), and number two, that Otis Redding was our favorite all time performer. Unlike Bill, I never had the pleasure of seeing Otis live, but this four-CD set is a very definitive representation of his short but significant contribution to popular music – helping to bridge the racial and music genre gaps that existed until the 1960s.

There are outtakes of many of his more popular tunes that I find very interesting, as well as enjoying the songs heard on the radio back in the day and now. He is timeless. Unfortunately, he died the week after he recorded “(Sittin’ On) The Dock Of The Bay” and never got to hear his biggest hit on the radio.

Laura Nyro
Laura Nyro Live At The Bottom Line
Cypress Records (1989)
Always a huge fan of Laura, I was gifted this out of production CD a few years ago (it’s available on eBay). Known mostly for her pop hits recorded by The Fifth Dimension, Barbra Streisand, Blood Sweat and Tears and others such as “Stoney End,” “Wedding Bell Blues,” “And When I Die,” and “Stoned Soul Picnic,” Laura’s emotive piano playing and vocal phrasing have always touched me. This is a great example live of those qualities as exemplified on songs such as “The Confession,” “My Innocence/Sophia” and “Broken Rainbow.” She also mixes in R&B covers of “High Heeled Sneakers,” “La La Means I Love You” and “Up On The Roof.” She has influenced many singers.
The Duhks
The Duhks
Sugar Hill Records (2005)
Having seen these multi-talented young musicians at Merlefest in 2005, I bought their CD immediately. I have rarely been as impressed by a group that offered so much a diversity and cultural music mixture. Running the gamut from Celtic, Portuguese, Cajun, Rock N’ Roll, as well as Black Sea Island Gospel music, these folks tear it up. Jesse Havey’s vocals are unreal, along with fellow band member Tania Elizabeth. “Death Came A Knockin”, “Dance Hall Girls”, “True Religion”, and “ The Waggoner’s Lad” stand out to me especially. I am unsure if they are still playing, but even with a change in membership, they put on a great show.
Mike Taylor
HolidayBand.com
Singer/songwriter and band leader for Southern soul/variety group, the Holiday Band, Mike has lived and breathed music since he was a kid. One of my faves.
Chicago
What’s It Gonna Be Santa?
Rhino (2003)
Twenty of the best arrangements of Christmas songs ever. Every song has a unique flavor, the changes are NOT traditional and the playing and singing is off the chart. I don’t usually like Christmas CDs much, but I love this one. You must listen two or three times to get used to the vibe.

Pete Lauro
Mary4Music.com
Peter “Blewzzman” Lauro reviews blues and indie music at Mary 4 Music, and I’m always happy to listen to his picks. Yeah!
Hubert Sumlin
Healing Feeling
Blacktop Records (1990)
This is one of my favorite CDS simply for the fact that it introduced me to the person who has become my all time favorite blues vocalist – Darrell Nulisch. While at a friend’s house, he happened to be playing the CD and when the song “Play It Cool” came on I was blown away. I asked him to let me see the CD jacket and bought it the very next day. It’s almost 12 years old and I still listen to it very regularly.

Roomful Of Blues
That’s Right
Alligator Records (2003)
You could easily put on a three-day blues festival just using the great musicians that have been a part of Roomful of Blues over the last 40 or some years. Through it all, the band has remained in tact and is still headlining blues festivals themselves. This is one of my favorite discs of theirs because it featured the debut of Mark DuFresne who I feel gave them back the punch they needed in a front man. This is real good stuff.
Downchild Blues Band
I Need A Hat
Linus Entertainment (2009)
This is another one of those bands that’s been around forever. As the story goes, they were supposedly the influence for the Blues Brothers. This Canadian band, led by Donny Walsh, has more discs out than I care to count, and this – their latest release – is one of their very best.

Pat Patterson
LargeTime.net
The S.C. Internet radio station owner (along with wife Robin) of Large Time Network is one of my favorite deejays, and has a wonderful collection of obscure music.
Rickey Godfrey
Nasty Man
Serenity Hill (2010)
There is a lot of good music available right now, but I have three favorites. I am a Rickey Godfrey fan through and through. His latest release Nasty Man is “Nasty” but in a good way!! Rickey is so talented and his talent shines with each song from his vocal ability to his amazing guitar licks. This CD should be in your collection right now. I feel that only Rickey could get away with the title “Nasty Man” and then on top of that pull off “I Want Me a Nasty Woman,” one of my favorites, as well as “When You’re Cool (The Sun Shines All The Time).” Only Rickey can make the blues shine.
Craig Woolard Band
Main Street People
Sisbro (2010)
Also on my list is Main Street People on Sisbro Records from The Craig Woolard Band. Beside the obvious songs on the charts “Your Love Is Amazing,” “Impossible,” and “Beachaholic,” there are some other great songs as well. “Soulful Kind Of Love,” I’m In Love With The Girl Next Door” and “Main Street People.” You can’t go wrong with this CD.

Dip Ferrell & the Truetones
Along For the Vibe
Arcade Records (2011)

The new CD from Dip Ferrell And The Truetones, Along For The Vibe, on Arcade Records is awesome. The shag tunes “Hey Girl” and “Love Monkey” will make you lay some leather down on the dance floor. Two beautiful ballads “Baby Come Back To Me” and “I’m Way Too Proud” have great story lines, yes songs do have story lines and these certainly do. Not only that, but the music is fabulous and makes for a true slow dance.

Stuff the stockings with these CDs and you can’t go wrong!!! I simply put them in and hit “Play” without skipping to the next song, and that to me makes a great “Stocking Stuffer” and CD. Merry Christmas and happy listening!!!!
Sheila Cain
http://www.live365.com/stations/
beaumontblues
Head honcho and radio host for Blues City Radio, Sheila Cain found time to give us her faves, despite the fact that she was in the middle of moving her life to Denver. Check out her radio show.
Karen Lovely
Still The Rain
Pretty Pear Records (2011)
Being a blues enthusiast, my number one pick this Christmas has to be Karen Lovely’s latest CD, Still The Rain. I’ve listened to every track over and over again and still can’t get enough.

The title track “Still The Rain” is contemporary blues at it’s very best. But don’t overlook one single song on this CD. Every one is a winner in my book. Tracks from this CD have kept Karen Lovely at the number one spot on Blues City Radio for the past eight weeks straight with no signs of slowing down.
Karen Lovely has the potential to become a blues phenom!
Etta James
Icon
Geffen Records (2010)
I don’t generally buy “collection” type CDs, but Etta James is the exception to the rule on this one.
Her CD Icon, a 12-song sampler spans the best of Etta over her illustrious career.

From “At Last” to “I’d Rather Go Blind,” this CD highlights her many hits. There’s just something about her sultry, soulful voice and lyrics that takes one on a musical journey that is hard (if not impossible) to duplicate. This is a “Must Have” CD for anyone who loves, blues, soul and R&B. I guarantee it will not be re-gifted.

Thanks to all my pals who contributed here. Happy Holidays to all!

Patman & Robin To the Rescue!

Posted in CD Picks, Interviews by darielb on February 9, 2011

Deejay Pat Patterson has always been about the music and since he and wife Robin formed the Large Time Network and Patman & Robin Records, it’s even more evident.

This dynamic duo is on a mission to find and share the best in “beach, boogie, blues and beyond,” and while they’re at it, let’s save the world from musical sameness and low budget crimes of production.

They’re my super heroes!

The Large Time Network (www.largetime.net) was formed on Feb. 2, 2010, about a month after the sale of John FM, where Pat had programmed music and was the on-air deejay.

Pat and Robin saw it as an opportunity to become even more involved with the music they both love – beach, boogie. blues and beyond. During his show, Pat plays a lot of older, obscure R&B from the 50s along with today’s popular tunes charting on Beach Music 45. He gets requests from all over the world.

The show streams live on Warp Radio from 4 to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday. Email your requests to pat@largetime.net.

“Robin and I both have such a love for the music,” Pat told me in a telephone interview last night. “We saw a label as another way to get more music out there. We wanted to give artists some other opportunities.

“Robin has a real good ear and a great feel for the music. She has a knack for ‘hearing’ a tune after about ten seconds.”

He went on to tell me that it was Robin who found “Till the Day After,” an old Huey Lewis tune and sent it to Mike Farber with the now defunct 120inc, who got it to N.C. beach artist Craig Woolard. Perfect song for Craig. It was Robin who found “I’m In Love With the Girl Next Door,” again another hit for Craig Woolard.

“We had a list of songs that we wanted to get for the new compilation CD Something ’bout the music! We had help from Bobby Simmons [former keyboard player with the Rickey Godfrey Band and now with Shag Attack] and Odell Mickens [with the Traamps and the New Jersey-based Wall Street]. Odell helped us out with Keisa Brown’s song.”

He’s referring to track no. 8, “Some Bridges Need Burning Down” by the Keisa Brown Band. Originally performed by Mississippi-born soul blues singer Keisa Brown, who passed away in 2006, this is a tribute by her band. Vocals are by drummer Jerome Tyus. “It’s different, “ says Pat, “They  left out some of the repeat vocals, put their own stamp on it. It’s a nice tribute to her.

“There’s a story to tell about ‘Muskrat Love,’ too. We’re good friends with Billy and Jack Jeffords. We were all out on the patio. They were playing some songs for us that they had written. All the brothers were there. All of a sudden they were playing ‘Muskrat Love.’ We told them: we want you to go into the studio and record it. Nothing fancy … exactly as they did it on the patio. Even with all of today’s technology, this was recorded raw – guitar, acoustic bass, bongos … no electronic enhancement … four vocals … one take. And Wayne, who was singing lead, passed away in Nov. 2010.”

Track no. 7 on the CD is “Can’t Get No Lovin’ Over the Telephone” by internationally known blues singer, Toni Spearman. “She’s originally from Greenwood,” Pat told me. “I get emails from all over the world – Zurich, India, China, Finland, from people who have seen her in concert the night before and she has talked about the CD and the Large Time Network. And what a band she has. During mastering, one of the guys wanted to know if this was her band or studio musicians … No, her band travels with her, and they are good!”

A side note here, mastering was done in Easley, S.C. at Buddy Strong’s Southeastern Sound Studios, known for their work with Marshall Tucker Band.

“I Can’t Wait Forever,” is written and performed by Grammy winner Debra Hutchinson, another Greenwood connection, by the way.

“I think “I’m Fixin’ To” by Rev. Bubba D Liverance and the Cornhole Prophets is a real sleeper,” says Pat.” It’s from his 2008 Let My Peoples Dance CD. Great song and production.”

The Joe Pope Tams weigh in with “Numbers,” chosen for its happy, upbeat sound.

Patman & Robin Records release 'Something 'bout the music!'

“Shaggin’ in the Moonlight” comes from the current generation of Swingin’ Medallions.

Track no. 12 is “Georgia Pine” by Chocolate Thunder from her 2008 Ear Candy CD, which was produced by bass player Franklin Wilkie,  who had the unenviable job of taking over after the death of Marshall Tucker Band’s Tommy Caldwell.

“Linda Rodney [aka Chocolate Thunder] has a tremendous voice. She has a great talent and needs to be put out so people can hear her.

So far the most successful single from Something ‘bout the music! is track no. 2, “My Knees Are Gettin’ Sore From Crawlin’ Back To Your Door.” Penned by Rickey Godfrey, lyrics are  – no surprise – humorous, clever and spot on. Shag Attack does a super job with the tune. Drummer Jimbo Durham is on vocals, and the song fits him to a T. The rest of this strong four-piece group is Bobby Simmons on keys, Ronnie Goldman playing guitar and Mike Hill on bass. Pat would like to see this group getting some more notice, and I have to agree. Rockin’ good job, guys.

Pat goes on to tell me that both the title track “Something ‘ bout the Music,” performed by Donnie Ray and the Earl Gaines tune, “You’ve Been Good To Me,” came via Memphis-based Ecko Records. “You’ve Been Good To Me” was released on a 2010 Earl Gaines recording titled Good To Me. He passed away New Year’s Eve in 2009.

“‘Something Bout the Music’ – the song, the feel, the music … that’s what we’re all about,” says Pat, and I can hear him smiling over the phone. He’s having a large time!

Track list for Something ‘bout the music! (Patman  Robin Records/ Sept. 2010) “Something Bout the Music,” Donnie Ray; “My Knees Are Gettin’ Sore From Crawling Back To Your Door, Shag Attack; “I Can’t Wait Forever,” Debra Hutchinson; “Kind Man,” Rickey Godfrey and Ronnie Godfrey; “I‘m Fixin’ To,” Rev. Bubba D Liverance; “Shaggin’ In the Moonlight,” The Swingin’ Medallions; “Can’t Get No Lovin’ Over the Telephone,” Toni Spearman; “Some Bridges Need Burning Down,” Keisa Brown Band; “You’ve Been Good To Me,” Earl Gaines; “Numbers,” Joe Pope Tams; “Muskrat Love,” Jeffords Brothers; “Georgia Pine,” Chocolate Thunder; “Justified,” Out of Towners; “Let’s Dance,” Don Dixon.

Something ‘bout the music! is available at the Large Time Network website (www.largetime.net), in North Myrtle Beach, S.C. at Judy’s House of Oldies on Main Street, and out of the back of Robin’s car.

JohnFM Streamin’ Beach, Boogie, Blues & Jazz

Posted in Music Stories by darielb on January 29, 2009

I couldn’t be happier that JohnFM is now streaming on the Web at http://www.johnfm.net. According to station owner John Broomfield, WWJN, better known as 104.9 John FM began streaming its beach, boogie, blues and jazz tunes to the world in November 2008. The format is what attracted me to John FM, but until now I could only catch a signal on a road trip down to the Hilton Head/Savannah area.There’s a real depth to the station’s programming. Every time I tune in to this station, there’s some great old soul song playing or a blues shuffle I’ve never heard.

It’s early beach music, from the obscure to the classic – pieces like “You Can’t Lose What You Ain’t Never Had” by Muddy Waters or “Hamhocks” by Big Joe Maher; oh, and “Baby What You Want Me To Do” from Jimmy Reid (I love Jimmy Reid); the early Dominoes; Big Joe and the Dyna-Flows and so many more.

If you’re familiar with the Carolinas, you know what I’m talking about. It’s early beach music, from the obscure to the classic – pieces like “You Can’t Lose What You Ain’t Never Had” by Muddy Waters or “Hamhocks” by Big Joe Maher; oh, and “Baby What You Want Me To Do” from Jimmy Reid (I love Jimmy Reid); the early Dominoes; Big Joe and the Dyna-Flows and so many more.

The distinctive format is a reflection of efforts by both John and Pat Patterson, who actually provides the programming for John FM. Both men are longtime lovers of early soul and beach artists. In a telephone interview, John Broomfield said, “It isn’t syndicated format. The music is all selected. I had music from my previous beach music station in Columbia, South Carolina, Magic 93.1. We played beach, boogie, and blues. My very good friend, the late Eddie “EZ” Zomberfield, was the DJ; he helped me get it up and running. In fact, we used to do a live broadcast from Ducks during SOS.

“This format is a spin-off of that one with the exception … I wanted to appeal to a broader base, so we added blues but still within the beach category.” Pat says, “My musical influence comes from the early soul artists. When I was in high school my favorite music was from the late 50s and 60s. Artists like William Bell, Rufus Thomas, Otis Redding, The Mar-Keys, Eddie Floyd and Sam and Dave.

“My favorite music is the old soul and rhythm and blues. I try to collect music from that era but it is hard to find. That is why two of my favorite collections are the complete Stax Volt singles collection from 1959 to 1968. I also have a Chess Records Decade Of Soul collection. I don’t care if they are 45s, albums, or 33s, if I can get them I will take them all. “I have trying to collect music since I was in high school and it never seems to be enough. I always run into that request that I don’t have. Since being a mobile DJ, I have had to broaden my music. Now I can cover from the 50s to today’s top 40. I have even been able to throw a polka in when I needed to.”
In addition to handling programmer chores, Pat also hosts the afternoon drivetime, Pat Patterson’s Beach Party, Monday through Friday from 4 to 9 p.m. AND the Low Country Boil (wife Robin came up with this apt show title) on Saturdays, noon until 4 p.m. For sister station Sunny 103.5 in Greenwood, S.C., Pat DJs The Beat of the Beach on Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and The Sunny Beach Party on Sundays from 2 to 6 p.m.

“I purchased the station two years ago,” John told me,“ but didn’t put the format on until about six months later. I started off playing just Christmas music [November 2006]; then I played straight jazz. Then I figured out the format.”

Listener comments, emails and the numbers all indicate that the format is a success. Pat told me,”I had an email last week from the president of the Hardeeville Chamber of Commerce saying this was the best format he’s heard.”

Listener reaction to streaming has been very positive. Listener comments in the website’s guestbook rave about both the station and DJs. The numbers for December 2008 report 2,542 with an average listening time of 149 minutes. John FM has also received a 2 share for the first Arbitron book and an overall rating of 1.8.

Pat went on to tell me, “We’re really happy with the response to the streaming. In fact, it was a low-key thing. We didn’t promote it beyond telling listeners during the shows and announcing
the website address.”

Until now, I haven’t heard Pat much on the radio. Instead, I’ve enjoyed him at events like the Charleston Beach Music Festival and during the Southern Soul entertainment series last year at the O.D. Beach Club. But I didn’t know a whole lot about him wanted to find out more about his background:

“I grew up in McCormickk , S.C.,” Pat tells me, “where I lived for 44 years until I met and married my beautiful wife, Robin. I served on City Council in McCormick for 18 years and also served as mayor pro tem.

“Also during my years in McCormick I served as Fire Chief. And, as Robin always reminds me, when we met I was working as a Nationally Registered Critical Care Paramedic for Greenwood County and now I am a DJ!

“I am the youngest of three. I have a older brother who lives in Lexington, S.C. and a older sister who lives in Greenwood. I lost both of my parents to cancer.

“One of my first DJ jobs was at my high school Long Cane Academy in McCormick. I started to volunteer to be the DJ at our school dances and that is when I got the bug. I never will forget that first job. I had two turntables and a box of 45s and albums, my how times have changed. I also played the drums at that time with a band called Southern Comfort. I have played for The Backwater Beach Band; Fresh Air, out of Columbia, S.C. and for four years I played for Hack Bartley in Hack Bartley and Visions.

“One of my most memorable experiences as a DJ has been to be nominated for Club and Mobile DJ and FM Radio DJ for four years in a row. Although I have not won the award itself, I feel that I am a winner just by being nominated; it is an honor to me.

“There was also the memorable wedding reception I did. Over an hour had gone by and the bride and groom had not yet shown up. Finally the bride comes rushing to my to me hands me a CD and says, ‘Play our first dance.’ I give them a grand introduction and they start to dance and I notice tension between the two. After about a minute into their first song the bride catches the groom with a mean right hook that buckled his knees!!! The rest is history, and after a mini brawl the reception was over. That was one for the scrap book.

“Most of my mobile DJ jobs come from word of mouth and from my website: http://www.djpatpatterson.net. I hope that in the future my territory will expand.”

In telling me about himself, Pat changed the subject often to his boss, John Broomfield. “Hats off to John,” he says. “I admire how he pays so much attention to the people who listen to the music. He’s a dancer … a very good dancer, active in the shag club events. He’s part of the community, not just the owner of a station. His contact with people is on a personal level, not just business. In fact, he brings a personal touch to the business that you just don’t see very often.”

If you’d like to check out the streaming beach, boogie, blues and jazz from John FM, log onto http://www.johnfm.net and click on the Warp Radio link.

Here’s the weekly lineup:
Monday – Friday
7 a.m.-Noon The Fez
Noon-1 p.m. Lunch At John’s
4 p.m.-9 p.m. Pat Patterson’s Beach Party
Saturday
12 noon – 4 p.m. Pat Patterson’s Low Country Boil
6 p.m.-9 p.m. On The Beach with Charlie Brown
Sunday
8 a.m.-12 noon The Sunday Morning Jazz Brunch
with Dave Fezler
John Broomfield, owner of John FM. DJ Pat Patterson
Station History
A little history is in order here. With stations changing format and call letters on a moment’s notice, it’s hard to keep track. According to a piece in online reference, Wikipedia, “104.9 signed on as WXRY-FM in 1985. The station changed call signs to WZBZ in 1988, then in 1990 as WSHG, “Shag FM.” In 1997, Shag FM moved its format to what was then WHBZ (now WXST) and became the original home of The Gator, while modern rock WWVV was on 106.9.
“WWVV was owned and operated by Triad Broadcasting, known locally as Adventure Radio (the name of the company that owned WWVV before Triad), as Triad did not want to scare off potential advertisers and/or listeners by announcing new station owners. WWVV and six other stations were bought by Triad in May 2000.” to a beach music station in 1990 as WSHG, “Shag FM.” In 1997, Shag FM moved its format to what was then WHBZ (now WXST) and became the original home of The Gator, while modern rock WWVV was on 106.9.
“WWVV was owned and operated by Triad Broadcasting, known locally as Adventure Radio (the name of the company that owned WWVV before Triad), as Triad did not want to scare off potential advertisers and/or listeners by announcing new station owners. WWVV and six other stations were bought by Triad in May 2000.”

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